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The second best medical advice anyone can give you is, “Find a veterinarian who knows and likes Bulldogs.” This is one of the reasons why it’s a good idea to join your local Bulldog Specialty Club. The members can usually refer you to a veterinarian who is familiar with Bulldogs and who likes them. Believe it or not – some veterinarians don’t like Bulldogs, and no matter how good a veterinarian lie is, he’s not a good one for your Bulldog.

The very best advice is to know your Bulldog. Check the entire dog daily. Know if he isn’t eating, if he isn’t playing, if he doesn’t seem quite right. Know immediately if something is wrong so you can take appropriate action.

There are several minor ailments you can treat at home. Remember that if a home remedy doesn’t cure the problem in two days, it’s time to take the dog to the veterinarian. Do not keep trying various methods of home medication.

Liquid Medications

The easiest way to give a liquid medication is with a syringe. You can get them from your veterinarian or most drug stores. You want at least a 2cc size. Discard the needle. Pull the proper amount of liquid into the syringe, open the dog’s mouth and “shoot” the liquid onto the back of his tongue.

Pills and capsules

Open the dog’s mouth, push the pill or capsule as far down his throat as possible, then hold his mouth shut and stroke his throat until he swallows. This has been known to work. Or wrap the pill or capsule in a bit of ground beef or cheese and feed it to the dog. This usually works.

Vomiting

For a minor upset stomach, Pepto Bismol or a similar medicine works best. The dose is according to the dog’s weight. If there is hard vomiting or if the upset lasts more than 24 hours, take the dog to your veterinarian.

Diarrhea

Kaopectate is most usually prescribed for minor diarrhea. Dose amount depends on the dog’s weight. If diarrhea continues longer than 24 hours or if there is blood in the stool, take the dog to the veterinarian.

Hot Spots

These are red, weepy, itchy spots. No one seems to really know what causes them. It could be fleas, food, allergies, etc. Clean the area thoroughly. You can wash with shampoo, rinse and dry. Or clean with Baby Wipes with lanolin and aloe. Or wash with Bigeloil. Then apply medications such as Panalog, Bag Balm, Sulfadene, Schreiner’s Healing Liniment (from a feed store), or 1% cortisone cream (you may need to get this from your own doctor). Clean and apply medication daily. You should see improvement by the second day, if not, take the dog to the veterinarian.

Interdigital Cysts

This is another problem that no one seems to be sure what the cause is But you’ll know one when you see an angry red swelling pop up between the dog’s toes. First examine the paw carefully, especially the underside between the pads to be sure there is no foreign matter (a thorn or such). If there is, take it out. Clean the area. Remedies include: (I) Soaking the paw in warm water and Epsom Salts or Massengale Douche solution, dry and rub in Panalog. (2) Desenex foot powder. (3) , Preparation H. (4) Division 5 Bulletin formula. Have your veterinarian make this up for you One part 60% DMSO, one part Gentavet solution 50 mg. per ml. Apply one drop per day; rub in with a Q Tip. Do NOT use more than one drop, do NOT apply more frequently than once a day. If you start the application at the first sign, this solution will prevent the cyst from developing. With all these treatments, it’s best to continue the treatment for two to three days after the cyst is gone.

Fungus Spots

These are somewhat like hot spots, but they are not weepy. Be sure you clean away all the “scabby” material. Wash the area and treat with Panalog, Keflex, or any good anti-fungal ointment. You can use Demorex shampoo or a sulfur-based soap for washing.

Facial Acne or Eczema

Bulldogs are forever putting their faces into all kinds of strange places. Some are susceptible to topical bacterial infections. The dog gets pimples on his face and chin. Usually, you can clear these up just by washing and rubbing in an anti-biotic ointment. Or you can try OXYIO (benzoyl peroxide) which you can purchase at a drug store. If they persist, you will need to get an oral anti-biotic medication from your veterinarian.

Eyes

Dust, wind, pollen, the things that make your eyes burn and water have the same effect on your Bulldog. You can rinse the eyes out with a solution such as Clear Eyes. If the eyes are badly irritated, use a contact lens ointment such as Bausch & Lomb Duolube. For any other eye ailment, take the dog to your veterinarian.

Cherry Eye

The gland which normally resides under the lower eyelid at the inside corner of the eye will sometimes “pop” out. This is not as horrible as it appears to be and does not require emergency treatment. It does require treatment at the earliest possible time by a veterinarian recommended for “Cherry Eye’t. The quicker the dog gets treatment the better the chance for successful treatment without removing the gland. Removal of the gland often results in a “dry” eye.

Tail

Some bulldogs have their tail set in a pocket. If yours does1 you will need to make a special effort to keep that pocket clean and dry. Wipe it out frequently. You may need to use cotton balls rather than a washcloth if the pocket is tight. Be sure to dry it thoroughly and apply an ointment such as Panalog, or a drying powder.

Temperature

You take his temperature just as you take a small baby’s – rectally. Use a good rectal thermometer, lubricate generously with Vaseline, insert gently, hold onto the thermometer dogs have been known to “suck” them in!, wait about five minutes, pull out and read. The normal temperature for most dogs is from 100.5 to 101.

Ice

Start giving your Bulldog pieces of ice to eat when he is still a small puppy so that he learns to like it. Luckily, most Bulldogs do. This is a great way to cool down a hot dog. Blocks of ice make a great summertime toy. A pan of ice in or on top of his crate helps keep him cool.

Insect Stings

If your Bulldog is stung by a bee or other insect, give him Benadryl (either capsule or liquid) and watch him closely for the next half hour. You may also apply an ice pack to the area where he was stung if you know where it is. If the area around the sting swells and hardens, if hives appear, if he seems to have difficulty breathing – rush him to the veterinarian. This is no time to dally, your dog’s life depends on quick treatment.


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